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Chilean President Sebastian Pinera arrives in UK

Chile's President Sebastian Pinera poses with the 33 rescued miners inside Copiapo Hospital, where the miners are undergoing full medical examinations October 14, 2010. Chile's 33 newly rescued miners recovered from their ordeal on Thursday while also pondering the celebrity status they have gained following a more than two-month entrapment deep under a remote desert. From L-R: (seated) Raul Bustos, Omar Reygadas, Esteban Rojas, Samuel Avalos, Daniel Herrera, Juan Carlos Aguilar, President Pinera, Pedro Cortez, Carlos Barrios, Carlos Bugueno, Carlos Mamani, Alex Vega, Claudia Llanez, Jose Henriquez and Osman Araya; (standing) Victor Zamora, Pablo Rojas, Luis Urzua, Victor Segovia, Mario Gomez, Johnny Barrios, Mario Sepulveda, Jorge Galleguillos, Juan Illanes, Claudio Acuna, Jimmy Sanchez, Ariel Ticona, Dario Segovia, Jose Ojeda, Richard Villarroel, Franklin Lobos (hidden), Renan Avalos, Florencio Avalos and Edison Pena. (Getty Images / REUTERS/Jose Manuel de la Maza/Chilean Presidency/Handout

October 16, 2010 (KATAKAMI / BBC) — Chile’s President Sebastian Pinera has arrived in the UK ahead of a European tour, as his country basks in the rescue of 33 trapped miners.

Mr Pinera brought fragments of rock from the San Jose mine as presents for Prime Minister David Cameron and the Queen.

The billionaire president is due to visit Churchill’s War Rooms in London and hold talks with Mr Cameron.

The rescue of the miners after 69 days has made headlines worldwide.

Thirty-one of the miners have now been released from hospital, with the remaining two being transferred to other hospitals.

One is suffering from a dental infection and the second is suffering from vertigo symptoms.

Mr Pinera, 60, said Churchill’s “blood, toil, tears and sweat” speech had provided inspiration to him during the battle to save the miners.

He also said he ignored political advice to steer clear of the rescue effort.

“Many people thought the rescue was impossible and advised me not to get involved, to keep my distance,” he said.

“I decided to take full responsibility without any political consideration… We made a commitment to look for the miners as if they were our sons.”

Like Mr Cameron, Mr Pinera was only elected this year, and his visit to London is thought to have been planned many months ago.

He is thought to be hoping to persuade more British companies, including mining corporations, to invest in Chile.

Mr Pinera, who greeted the miners with a hug after their rescue, told The Times: “Chile will now be remembered and recognised not for Pinochet but as an example of unity, leadership, courage, faith and success.”

He also told the newspaper he had a “very strong admiration” for Mr Cameron.

Mr Pinera flew in to London’s Heathrow Airport and, after sightseeing in London on Sunday, will meet Mr Cameron and have an audience with the Queen, who has extended an invitation at the last minute following the mine rescue.

He is visiting France and Germany later this week.

Mr Pinera revealed that his father-in-law died only hours before the miners were rescued and he had told the president: “Don’t give up. Keep working to rescue the miners.”

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Chilean President Sebastian Pinera heads for UK

President Pinera (left) is on the crest of a wave after the miners were rescued

October 16, 2010 (KATAKAMI / BBC) — Chile’s President Sebastian Pinera is due to arrive in the UK ahead of European tour, riding on the crest of a wave after the rescue of the 33 miners.

Mr Pinera will be bringing fragments of rock from the San Jose mine as presents for Prime Minister David Cameron and the Queen.

The billionaire president is due to visit Churchill’s War Rooms in London and have talks with Mr Cameron.

The rescue of the miners after 69 days has made headlines worldwide.

Thirty-one of the miners have now been released from hospital, with the remaining two being transferred to other hospitals.

One is suffering from a dental infection and the second is suffering from the symptoms of vertigo.

Mr Pinera, 60, said Churchill’s “blood, toil, tears and sweat” speech had provided inspiration to him during the battle to save the miners.

He also said he ignored political advice to steer clear of the rescue effort: “Many people thought the rescue was impossible and advised me not to get involved, to keep my distance.

“I decided to take full responsibility without any political consideration… We made a commitment to look for the miners as if they were our sons.”

Like Mr Cameron, Mr Pinera was only elected this year, and his visit to London is thought to have been planned many months ago.

He is thought to be hoping to persuade more British companies, including mining corporations, to invest in Chile.

Mr Pinera, who greeted the miners with a hug after their rescue, told The Times: “Chile will now be remembered and recognised not for Pinochet but as an example of unity, leadership, courage, faith and success.”

He also told the newspaper he had a “very strong admiration” for Mr Cameron.

Mr Pinera will arrive at London’s Heathrow Airport later and, after sightseeing in London on Sunday, he will meet Mr Cameron and have an audience with the Queen, who has extended an invitation at the last minute following the mine rescue.

He is visiting France and Germany later this week.

Mr Pinera revealed that his father-in-law died only hours before the miners were rescued and he had told the president: “Don’t give up. Keep working to rescue the miners.”

Chile’s President Gives The Queen Mine Rock

 

Chile's President Pinera met with the miners in hospital

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October 16, 2010(KATAKAMI/ SKY NEWS) — Fresh from greeting the 33 rescued miners, Chile’s President Sebastian Pinera flies to the UK today for talks with David Cameron.

Mr Pinera told The Times newspaper he is bringing gifts of rock from the mine where the men were trapped for the Prime Minister and the Queen.

The 33 workers were all safely rescued from the San Jose mine this week and all but two have since been discharged from hospital.

The president, who was elected earlier this year, captured the world’s attention as he stood in a pit helmet ready to greet each man with a hug as they emerged.

The 60-year-old leader told The Times he was inspired by Winston Churchill’s phrase of “Blood, toil, tears and sweat” during the desperate wait for the miners’ rescue.

“Many people thought the rescue was impossible and advised me not to get involved, to keep my distance,” he said.

“I decided to take full responsibility without any political consideration… We made a commitment to look for the miners as if they were our sons.”

However, Mr Pinera’s visit to the UK comes amid news of a worker’s death at a gold mine in Petorca.

Benitez Roberto Fernandez, 26, was killed when he was hit by falling rocks.

It is the second fatal case in the region in 10 days.

Mr Pinera has vowed to improve working conditions across the nation in the wake of the rescue of the San Jose miners.

The president arrives at London’s Heathrow Airport on Saturday afternoon and will visit the British Museum and Churchill’s Cabinet War Rooms on Sunday.

On Monday he will meet Mr Cameron at Downing Street before having an audience with the Queen at Buckingham Palace.

The Harvard-educated businessman-turned-politician told The Times he hoped Chile’s international standing had been boosted by the recent rescue effort.

He aslo hoped British entrepreneurs would now invest more in his country.

“Chile will now be remembered and recognised not for Pinochet but as an example of unity, leadership, courage, faith and success,” he said.

Mr Pinera added he believed God’s help was “absolutely essential” in the successful rescue.

He described Chile and the UK as having a “real community of values” and said he hoped to forge a relationship with Mr Cameron, for whom he expressed “a very strong admiration”.

Speaking of the visit, he told The Times: “For us it’s a great honour. I am bringing with me a gift of pieces of rock taken from the depth of the mine and will give one to the Prime Minister and one to the Queen.”

Mr Pinera will also give a lecture at the London School of Economics before visiting France and Germany.

Chile’s Pinera heads to Europe

Chile's President Sebastian Pinera (R) holds a news conference after meeting with the 33 rescued miners, outside Copiapo hospital October 14, 2010. Chile's 33 newly rescued miners recovered from their ordeal on Thursday while also pondering the celebrity status they have gained following a more than two-month entrapment deep under a remote desert. Pinera is flanked by Atacama Region Superintendent Ximena Matas and Chile's Health Minister Jaime Manalich (L). (GETTY IMAGES / REUTERS/Carlos Vera )

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October 16, 2010 (KATAKAMI / SMH.COM.AU/ AFP) — Chilean President Sebastian Pinera begins a trip on Friday to Britain, France and Germany, as he basks in the glory of the spectacular rescue of 33 miners trapped for more than two months.

Pinera travels first to London, where he will meet British Prime Minister David Cameron and stay until Tuesday, an official with the presidency told AFP.

He then goes to Paris, where he will stay until Thursday and meet President Nicolas Sarkozy. After that he heads to Berlin, where he will meet German Chancellor Angela Merkel. The trip wraps up on Saturday.

No further details of the trip have been released – neither the foreign ministry nor the president’s office have handed out an official travel agenda.

Officials however said that any agenda will likely have last-minute changes because Pinera has received so many requests for interviews from foreign media to talk about the miners.

“Undoubtedly,” Chilean Foreign Minister Alfredo Moreno said, the rescue of theminers “will be a much discussed topic”.

As gifts, Pinera will be taking bags containing rocks from inside the mine along with copies of the initial hand-written message from the miners telling rescuers that they had survived the accident and were fine, according to the local magazine Que Pasa.

A sentence printed on each bag will read: “In your hands are rocks from the depths of the earth and the spirit of 33 Chilean miners,” the magazine said.

Pinera linked himself closely to the rescue early in the operation. He travelled to the San Jose mine in far northern Chile, where the men were trapped, six times to oversee operations.

He then stayed at the site for 22 hours as the miners were rescued one by one, and hugged the miners as they left their rescue capsule. Later he visited the rescued miners in the hospital.

Meanwhile, 31 of the 33 miners were back home on Friday after doctors gave them the all clear to pick up their lives again.

Regional health director Paola Neumann said the two remaining miners, who were not named, had been transferred to clinics for more treatment, one for dental surgery, the other suffering from spells of dizziness.

The 28 miners were driven discreetly from the hospital in the northern mining town of Copiapo without stopping to speak to a horde of journalists camped outside hoping for interviews.

Singapore’s Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong congratulates Chile leader

Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong has written to Chile President Sebastian Pinera, congratulating him on the successful rescue of the 33 trapped miners. -- ST PHOTO: FRANCIS ONG PG

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October 15, 2010 (KATAKAMI / THE STRAITSTIMES.COM) — PRIME Minister Mr Lee Hsien Loong has written to Chile President Sebastian Pinera, congratulating him on the successful rescue of 33 miners trapped in a collapsed mine.

The miners’ gripping ordeal began on Aug 5 when a mine under Chile’s far northern Atacama desert caved in. The curtains fell on the two-month-long drama on Thursday when the last miner was safely pulled out, sending a world which had been holding its breath into outbursts of joy.

PM Lee also congratulated Mr Pinera for his ‘professional execution of an extremely difficult and riskyoperation’.

‘ This success would not have been possible without the Chilean government’s steady leadership and resolve,’ he wrote.

‘Many Singaporeans watching the rescue operations have been impressed by the spirit and resilience of the Chilean people.

‘ We share the joy and celebration of the Chilean people, and especially with the families of the rescued miners.

‘I wish all the rescued miners a speedy recovery to good health.’

First 3 Chilean miners head home from hospital

 

Andre Sougarret (3rd L), chief of the rescue mission, poses with miners Daniel Herrera (L), Jose Ojeda (4th L), Jorge Galleguillos (4th R), Ariel Ticona (3rd R), Alex Vega (2nd R), and Claudio Yanez, and other members of the rescue team during a meeting in the Copiapo Hospital in Copiapo, Octobeer 14, 2010. Chile's 33 rescued miners recovered from their two-month ordeal on Thursday as the offers and gifts that go along with their new celebrity status started to roll in, including an invitation to Graceland. (REUTERS/Codelco/Handout )

 

October 14, 2010. COPIAPO, Chile  (KATAKAMI / MSNBC.COM) — The first three miners left the hospital late Thursday night as all now known as “los 33” began their unfamiliar new lives as national heroes.

Chilean TV showed miner Edison Pena, plucked 12th from the cavern where they were trapped for more than two months a half mile underground, getting out of the hospital in Copiapo first.

All three miners, still wearing their shades, piled into an SUV bound for home, smiling and waving.
“I didn’t think I’d make it back, so this reception really blows my mind,” said Pena, 34, as waiting neighbors showered him with confetti. Triathlete Pena ran 6 miles a day down in the mine tunnel in the days after the collapse to cope with the stress.

“We really had a bad time,” he added, before ducking into his home and closing the front door.
All the miners got tastes of what awaits: swarms of reporters, TV producers, publicity agents and even soccer teams all desperate for a piece of their story.

The men posed in hospital bathrobes for a group photo with President Sebastian Pinera.

Unity helped the men for 69 days underground, including more than two weeks when no one knew whether they were alive.

But the moment they walk out the hospital doors, they’ll go beyond the reach of a government operation that has cared for, fed and protected them in a carefully coordinated campaign to ensure each of them would leave in top condition.

“Now they’re going to have to find their equilibrium and take care of themselves,” the hospital chaplain, the Rev. Luis Lopez, told The Associated Press.

They got quite the preview Thursday of what lies ahead. On their first full day of fresh air, the miners were probably the 33 most in-demand people on the planet.

A Greek mining company wants to bring them to the sunny Aegean islands, competing with rainy Chiloe in the country’s southern archipelago, whose tourism bureau wants them to stay for a week.

Soccer teams in Madrid, Manchester and Buenos Aires want them in their stadiums. Bolivia’s president wants them at his palace. TV host Don Francisco wants them all on his popular “Sabado Gigante” show in Miami.

Hearing that miner Edison Pena jogged regularly in the tunnels below the collapsed rock, the New York City marathon invited him to participate in next month’s race.

What about a reality show? Some other kind of TV work? Why not, said television writer-producer and Oscar nominee Lionel Chetwynd, who said he expected projects were being pitched around Hollywood within hours of the rescue.

“Television is a quick-response medium,” he said, joking: “In fact, I think I’ll call my agent when we get off the phone.”

Doctors said the other miners would get out of the hopital Friday and over the weekend.

Their families and friends were organizing welcome-home dinners, street celebrations and even weddings. Lilianett Ramirez, whose husband Mario Gomez promised her a church wedding in the “Dear Lila” letter Pinera read on TV when the men were found alive, said they have now set a date: “If God and the Virgin desire it, we’ll get married on Nov. 7, his birthday,” she said, beaming as she left the hospital.

The government promised six months of psychological treatment, made sure each has a bank account only he can operate, and coached them on dealing with rude questions.

The rescue team even asked Guinness World Records to honor all 33 with the record for longest time trapped underground, rather than the last miner out, Luis Urzua. Guinness spokeswoman Jamie Panas said the organization was studying the question.

The men certainly have an extraordinary story to tell. No one before them had been trapped so long and survived.

Pinera also was defining face of the rescue, embracing Luis Urzua when he climbed out of the pod to become the 33rd miner out, then leading a joyous crowd in the national anthem.
“They have experienced a new life, a rebirth,” he said, and so has Chile: “We aren’t the same that we were before the collapse on Aug. 5. Today Chile is a country much more unified, stronger and much more respected and loved in the entire world.”

The billionaire businessman-turned-politician also promised “radical” changes and tougher safety laws to improve how businesses treat their workers.

“Never again in our country will we permit people to work in conditions so unsafe and inhuman as they worked in the San Jose mine, and in many other places in our country,” said Pinera, who took office in March as Chile’s first elected right-wing president in a half-century.

Among the most compelling stories from the ordeal will be Urzua’s. He was the shift foreman when 700,000 tons of rock sealed them in. It was his strict rationing of the 48-hour food supply that helped them stay alive until help came.

Early reports on their food supply were based on memories and partial information from down below. Based on new details the miners shared Thursday with their families, the rationing appears to have been even more extreme than previously thought.

“He told me they only had 10 cans of tuna to share, and water, but it isn’t true the thing about milk, because it was bad, out of date,” Alberto Sepulveda said after visiting his brother Dario.

Other family members were told the tuna amounted to about half a capful from the top of a soda bottle — and that the only water they could drink tasted of oil.

“I think he was a fundamental pillar that enabled them to keep discipline,” said Manuel Gonzalez, the first rescuer down and the last to leave.

“The guys that were down there, I think they never lost their hope,” he added. “There were critical moments, but at the end they never lost their hope because they had very positive leaders who kept the group unified.”

 

 

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World congratulates Chile on miners’ ‘glorious’ rescue

Chilean President Sebastian Pinera sings the national anthem with the last miner to be rescued, Luis Urzua, credited with organizing the miners to ration food and save themselves, at the end of the operation at the San Jose mine in Copiapo October 13, 2010. All of Chile's 33 trapped miners were rescued from deep underground in a special capsule on Wednesday as an extraordinary two-month survival story many call a miracle triggered wild celebrations. (Getty Images)

 

October 14, 2010 (KATAKAMI) — “Glorious”, “historic”, “heroic”: were among the words used by those watching in awe Wednesday as 33 miners trapped 700 metres underground in northern Chile were one by one lifted to the surface after more than two months.

More than two-thirds of the 33 miners have been removed from the San Jose copper mine that collapsed and trapped them more than 700 metres below the surface Aug 5. They have been elevated in a capsule through a narrowly bored hole.

Chilean President Sebastian Pinera said the rescue might be completed later Wednesday.

“The schedule has gotten tighter, because at the start the operation to rescue each miner took one hour,” Pinera said. “Now we are progressing at a rate of 40 minutes per rescue.”

The health of the workers who have so far been rescued from the mine is “quite good”, Chilean Health Minister Jaime Manalich said. They have generally suffered increased heart rate and blood pressure, but doctors are not worried.

The rescue operation took place in an atmosphere of euphoria, patriotism, religious fervour and optimism for the fate of the miners who are still trapped underground. Tension virtually vanished after the first couple of miners were rescued.

Pinera, who arrived at the mine Tuesday afternoon, stressed that he would stay at the site until the last of the miners is out.

He defined the early hours of Wednesday when the first miners were lifted to the surface as “a magical night” and “a night in which life defeated death.”

“It is a night that we are going to remember all our lives,” he said.

Bolivian President Evo Morales was on site to meet with compatriot Carlos Mamani, 23, who was the only non-Chilean among the trapped miners.

“This is a historic event. We Bolivian authorities are grateful for the effort that Chileans made,” Morales said.

Morales offered Mamani a job and a home in Bolivia in case he wants to return to his native country, and said he was willing to take the miner home immediately if he wished to go.

Mamani made it clear, however, that he wants to stay in Chile, at least for a few days. He plans to meet up with the other miners on the surface, once the ordeal is over for all of them.

Television channels around the world were broadcasting the rescue live, and prominent world leaders were among those following closely.

US President Barack Obama recounted the emergence of the first miner, Florencio Avalos, 31, and the subsequent reunification with his family early Wednesday.

“The tears they shed after so much time apart expressed not only their own relief, not only their own joy, but the joy of people everywhere,” Obama told reporters at the White House.

Obama congratulated the Chilean people, who he said have “inspired the world.”

Many others agreed.

“The whole world is proud of what Chile is doing,” Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva told Pinera, according to his spokesman in Brasilia.

Spain’s Deputy Prime Minister Maria Teresa Fernandez de la Vega described events in Chile as a “real heroic deed.” The rescue operation constituted “more evidence of how technology is in the service of humanity,” she said at a conference bringing together engineering and renewable energies experts.

British Prime Minister David Cameron was also among those who congratulated Chile.

“I’m sure everyone would like me to, on their behalf, send best wishes to the president and people of Chile as they celebrate the trapped miners coming to the surface and the glorious pictures we can see on our television screens,” Cameron said in Parliament.

European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso also expressed “great admiration” for the rescue.

“The comradeship and the resilience of the miners, the thoughtfulness and efficiency of the operation and the solidarity of all concerned have already given to the world a message of hope and confidence,” Barroso said.

NASA flight surgeon James Polk, however, was more cautious: medical and engineering problems could still arise.

“It’s not unlike a football game, we are at half time right now and you don’t want to let your guard down,” he said in an interview with CNN.

Still, Polk, who consulted with Chilean officials as part of the NASA team that provided advice about spending months in confined spaces, also poured praise on Chilean authorities.

“They implemented the advice and sought out the experts,” he said. “And they did just a fantastic job, although there’s a long way to go yet, things are looking very good.”

(WEBINDIA123.COM)

Photostream : Chile Mine Rescue Efforts

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In this photo released by the Chilean government, miner Esteban Rojas, 44, gets on his knees to pray after being rescued from the collapsed San Jose gold and copper mine, near Copiapo, Chile, Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2010. Rojas was the eighteenth of the 33 miners rescued from the mine after more than two months trapped underground

(AP Photo/Hugo Infante, Chilean government)

In this photo released by the Government of Chile, miner Omar Reygadas Rojas, holds a Bible after being rescued from the collapsed San Jose gold and copper mine, near Copiapo, Chile, Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2010. Reygadas was the seventeenth of 33 miners rescued from the mine after more than 2 months trapped underground.

(AP Photo/Hugo Infante, Government of Chile)

Trapped miner Omar Reygadas (in green) embraces his son after reaching the surface to become the 17th to be rescued from the San Jose mine in Copiapo October 13, 2010. Seventeen of 33 trapped miners have been rescued from the gold and copper mine in Chiles northern Atacama desert in a painstaking operation still under way. REUTERS/Hugo Infante/Government of Chile/Handout
In this photo released by the Government of Chile, miner Daniel Herrera Campos embraces his mother after being rescued from the collapsed San Jose gold and copper mine, near Copiapo, Chile, Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2010. Herrera was the sixteenth of 33 miners rescued from the mine after more than 2 months trapped underground.

(AP Photo/Hugo Infante, Government of Chile)

Trapped miner Victor Segovia (C) reaches the surface to become the 15th to be rescued from the San Jose mine in Copiapo October 13, 2010. Sixteen of Chiles 33 trapped miners were hoisted to safety in a cramped rescue capsule on Wednesday, punching the air and hugging their families in a triumphant end to their two-month ordeal. REUTERS/Hugo Infante/Government of Chile/Handout
In this photo released by the Chilean presidential press office, Chiles President Sebastian Pinera, back, greets miner Victor Zamora Bugueno after his rescue from the collapsed San Jose gold and copper mine, near Copiapo, Chile, Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2010.

(AP Photo/Jose Manuel de la Maza, Chilean Presidential Press Office)

In this photo released by the Chilean government, miner Carlos Barrios waves to the crowd while emerging from the capsule that brought him to the surface from the collapsed San Jose gold and copper mine near Copiapo, Chile, Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2010. Barrios is the thirteenth of 33 miners who was rescued after more than 2 months trapped underground.

(AP Photo/Hugo Infante, Chilean government)

In this photo released by the Chilean government, Edison Pena, gestures as he is carried on a stretcher after being rescued at the San Jose mine, near Copiapo, Chile, Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2010. Pena was the twelfth of 33 miners rescued from the San Jose mine after more than 2 months trapped underground.

(AP Photo/Hugo Infante, Chilean government)

In this photo released by the Chilean government, Jorge Galleguillos, the eleventh miner rescued from the collapsed San Jose gold and copper mine waves to the crowd after been trapped with 32 other miners for over two months near Copiapo, Chile, Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2010

(AP Photo/Hugo Infante, Chilean government)

In this photo released by the Chilean government, miner Alex Vega gestures after being rescued from the collapsed San Jose gold and copper mine where he had been trapped with 32 other miners for over two months near Copiapo, Chile, Wednesday Oct. 13, 2010.

(AP Photo/Hugo Infante, Chilean government)

Roxana Gomez, left, daughter of miner Mario Gomez, is comforted by Maria Segovia, sister of trapped miner Dario Segovia, as they watch on TV Gomezs rescue from the collapsed San Jose mine at the camp outside the mine near Copiapo, Chile, Wednesday Oct. 13, 2010. Thirty-three miners became trapped when the gold and copper mine collapsed on Aug. 5.

(AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

In this photo released by the Chilean government, miner Florencio Avalos is carried away on a stretcher after being rescued from the collapsed San Jose gold and copper mine where he was trapped with 32 other miners for over two months near Copiapo, Chile, early Wed Oct. 13, 2010

(AP Photo/Hugo Infante, Chilean government)

In this photo released by the Chilean government, miner Claudio Yanez applauds as he is carried away in a stretcher after being rescued from the collapsed San Jose gold and copper mine where he had been trapped with 32 other miners for over two months near Copiapo, Chile, early Wed Oct. 13, 2010.

(AP Photo/Hugo Infante, Chilean government)

In this photo released by the Chilean government, miner Florencio Avalos, second left, hugs a relative after he was rescued from the collapsed San Jose gold and copper mine where he was trapped with 32 other miners for over two months near Copiapo, Chile, early Wed, Oct. 13, 2010.

(AP Photo/Hugo Infante, Chilean government)

Alfonso Avalos (right) father of Chilean miner Florencio Avalos and Wilson Avalos brother of Florencio embrace each other after Florencio was brought to the surface from the collapsed San Jose mine, near Copiapo. Rescue workers in Chile by had lifted to safety nearly a third of the 33 miners trapped deep underground, in an historic and complex operation carried off without a hitch.

(AFP/Hector Retamal)

Relatives of miner Carlos Barrios react while watching on a TV screen the rescue operation at the camp outside the San Jose mine near Copiapo, Chile, Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2010. Barrios was the thirteenth of 33 miners who was rescued from the collapsed gold and copper mine after more than 2 months trapped underground

(AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

Residents rally in support of the miners trapped in the San Jose mine, as they gather to watch the rescue on a large screen in a public square in Copiapo October 12, 2010. Chiles 33 trapped miners are set to travel nearly half a mile through solid rock in a shaft just wider than a mans shoulders on Tuesday night, as their two month ordeal after a cave-in draws to an end

REUTERS/Mariana Bazo