Katakamidotcom News Indonesia

Please also visit : KATAKAMIDOTCOMNEWSINDONESIA.BLOGSPOT.COM

Daily Archives: 07/14/2010

Obama, Winfrey among guests invited for Chelsea Clinton’s wedding

July 14, 2010

Washington(KATAKAMI / ANI/ INDIAVISION ): U.S. President Barack Obama and talk show queen Oprah Winfrey are among the guests invited to attend the wedding of Chelsea Clinton and Mark Mezvinsky.

The guest list of the July 31 nuptials that will be held at Aster Court in the picturesque village of Rhinebeck, New York has been reported by the Hudson Valley News.

Obama is expected to land at Stewart Airport in Newburgh, New York and take Marine One across the Hudson to Rhinebeck, reports Radaronline.com

Among the 500 A-list guests who will watch Chelsea walk down the aisle are singer Barbra Streisand, Kate Capshaw and Steven Speilberg, former Clinton advisor Harold Ickes, Clinton money man Terry McAuliffe, former British Prime Minister John Major, historian Doris Kearns Goodwin, media moguls Ted Turner and long-time Clinton friend Denise Rich.

Locals are preparing for a celebrity overload in the rural town, as Hollywood royalty and political powerhouses will join Former President Bill Clinton and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton to celebrate the marriage of their only daughter.

Medvedev congratulates Sarkozy on the French national holiday, Bastille Day

https://i1.wp.com/upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/fb/Medvedev_meets_Sarkozy.jpg

July 14, 2010

(KATAKAMI / KREMLIN.RU)  Dmitry Medvedev sent a message of congratulations to President of France Nicolas Sarkozy on the French national holiday, Bastille Day.

The President said in his message, in particular:

“Russia and France are working ever more fruitfully together in a broad range of areas today. The summits in Paris and St Petersburg were further evidence of the strategic nature of our relations and our mutual long-term commitment to implementing promising big projects aimed at ensuring our trade and economic partnership’s stable growth. We are also ready to continue building up our mutually advantageous business cooperation with an emphasis on advanced technology.

We think the bilateral dialogue we pursue on coordinating our approaches to topical issues on the international agenda is very useful and important. I am sure that Russia and France, through their joint constructive efforts, can make a big contribution to settling regional conflicts and effectively addressing the global threats and challenges facing humanity in the twenty-first century.

Our multifaceted ties have received a big boost in their expansion through the organisation of the Year of Russia in France and the Year of France in Russia. The extensive programmes of interlinked events organised for this project highlight just how closely interwoven are the history and culture of countries, and how deep are our traditions of friendship, respect and sympathy.”

Penelope Cruz and Javier Bardem married in small ceremony in Bahamas

https://i2.wp.com/1.1.1.5/bmi/cache.daylife.com/imageserve/06SA5SF9fG9pt/610x.jpg

Spanish actors Javier Bardem and Penelope Cruz have joined the ranks of Oscar-winning married couples after tying the knot in the Bahamas earlier this month, according to several celebrity magazines on July 13, 2010. (Getty)

July 14, 2010

(KATAKAMI / MIRROR.CO.UK)  Penelope Cruz and Javier Bardem got married in the Bahamas earlier this month, her representative said.

Amanda Silverman confirmed the couple were married at the beginning of July at a friend’s house.

She said the ceremony for the 36-year-old Cruz and the 41-year-old Bardem was a small one that only family members attended.

Cruz’s wedding dress was designed by longtime friend, fashion designer John Galliano.

Cruz and Bardem are from Spain. They appeared together in the 2008 Woody Allen romantic comedy Vicky Cristina Barcelona. Cruz won a supporting-actress Oscar for her role.

Bardem won a supporting-actor Oscar for the 2007 crime thriller No Country for Old Men.  (*)

Medvedev, Merkel to sign memorandum on Skolkovo project

German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Russian President Dmitry Medvedev. Archive

German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Russian President Dmitry Medvedev.

 

July 14, 2010

 

(KATAKAMI / RIA NOVOSTI)  Russian President Dmitry Medvedev and German Chancellor Angela Merkel will sign a memorandum of understanding on Russia’s Skolkovo innovation hub, Russian Mayak radio station said Wednesday.

Medvedev and Merkel will meet on July 14-15 in Yekaterinburg as part of Russian-German interstate consultations.

The sides are due to sign a memorandum of understanding between the Skolkovo foundation and Germany’s Siemens AG.

Medvedev and Merkel are also expected to discuss bilateral trade, economic, cultural and humanitarian ties, and international affairs, and sign more than 10 documents, including a memorandum on a managerial personnel training program, a statement of intent on cooperation in physical education and sport, and an agreement on cooperation between the countries’ public health ministries.

They will also meet with Russian and German business representatives.

The Russian companies Rostekhnologii and RusHydro will also sign a partnership agreement with Siemens AG on the establishment of a joint venture to manufacture power units.

President Obama Announces a New OMB Director: Jacob Lew

President Obama Shakes Hand with Jacob Lew, His Nominee for OMB Director
President Barack Obama announces the nomination of Jack Lew to replace Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Director Peter Orszag during a statement to the press in the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House July 13, 2010. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)

July 13, 2010

Watch the VIDEO

(KATAKAMI / WHITE HOUSE GOV) Good afternoon.  Before I begin, I just want to note a breakthrough that we’ve had on our efforts to pass the most comprehensive reform of Wall Street since the Great Depression.  Three Republican senators have put politics and partisanship aside to support this reform, and I’m grateful for their decision, as well as all the Democrats who’ve worked so hard to make this reform a reality — particularly Chairman Dodd and Chairman Barney Frank.What members of both parties realize is that we can’t allow a financial crisis like this one that we just went through to happen again.  This reform will prevent that from happening.  It will prevent a financial crisis like this from happening again by protecting consumers against the unfair practices of credit card companies and mortgage lenders.  It will ensure that taxpayers are never again on the hook for Wall Street’s mistakes.  And it will end an era of irresponsibility that led to the loss of eight million jobs and trillions of dollars of wealth.  This reform is good for families; it’s good for businesses; it’s good for the entire economy.  And I urge the Senate to act quickly so that I can sign it into law next week.

Now, as we finish our work on Wall Street reform, we’re also mindful that we’ve got significant work to do when it comes to reforming our government and reducing our deficit.  As part of that work, today I am proud to announce the nomination of Jack Lew to be our nation’s next Director of Office of Management and Budget — or OMB.

https://i2.wp.com/1.1.1.4/bmi/cache.daylife.com/imageserve/0e2Xfni2pN5ZH/610x.jpg

Photo : U.S. President Barack Obama (R) announces that he has named Jacob J. ‘Jack’ Lew (L) to serve as Director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) in the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House July 13, 2010 in Washington, D.C. Lew, who previously served under President Clinton, will replace Peter R. Orszag who is leaving the position at the end of the month. (Getty)

Before telling you a little bit about Jack, I just want to say a few words about the man that he will be replacing at the helm of OMB, and that’s Mr. Peter Orszag.  A few weeks ago, Peter told me that after more than a year and a half of tireless, around-the-clock service in what is one of the toughest jobs around, Peter was ready to move on to a job that offers a little more sanity and fewer line items.

Putting a budget together for the entire federal government is an enormously difficult task, no matter what the state of the economy, but Peter’s job was even tougher.  When we walked through the doors of the White House, we not only faced the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression, we also faced a $1.3 trillion deficit — a deficit that was caused both by the recession and nearly a decade of not paying for key policies and programs.

In light of these challenges, Peter’s accomplishments as Director of OMB are even more impressive.  He was instrumental in designing and helping us pass an economic plan that prevented a second depression — a plan that is slowly but surely moving us in the right direction again.  Thanks to his innovative ideas and gritty determination, we passed a health insurance reform plan that is not only paid for, but will significantly lower the cost of health care as well as our deficit over the next several decades.  In fact, a recent report by independent experts say this reform will cut the deficit even more than the Congressional Budget Office first estimated.

https://i0.wp.com/1.1.1.5/bmi/cache.daylife.com/imageserve/0fJdak35iHcGx/610x.jpg

Photo : U.S. President Barack Obama announces that he has selected Jacob J. ‘Jack’ Lew to serve as Director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) in the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House July 13, 2010 in Washington, D.C. Lew, who previously served under President Clinton, will replace Peter R. Orszag who is leaving the position at the end of the month. (Getty)

Peter has also helped us single out more than a hundred programs for elimination that have outlived their purposes, and made hard decisions that will save tens of billions of dollars.  And he helped draft a budget for next year that freezes all discretionary government spending outside of national security for three years — something that was never enacted in the prior administration.  It’s a budget that would reduce the deficit by more than $1 trillion over the next decade, which is more than any other budget in a decade.  And I expect that freeze to become a reality next year.

Peter also shares my view that the long-running debate between big government and small government misses the point; it isn’t relevant to today’s challenges.  The real debate is about how we make government smarter, more effective, and more efficient in the 21st century.  It’s easy for any institution to get in the habit of doing things the way they’ve always been done.  We in government can’t afford that habit — not only because it wastes taxpayer dollars, but because it erodes people’s belief that their government can actually work for them.

Over the last year and a half we’ve been able to employ new technology to make government more responsive and customer-friendly — the same way that so many businesses have used technology to make better products and provide better services.

As a result of these efforts, today we’re creating a single electronic medical record for our men and women in uniform that will follow them from the day they enlist until the day they are laid to rest.  We’re cutting down the time that it takes to get a patent approved by cutting out unnecessary paperwork and modernizing the process.  We’re working to give people the chance to go online and book an appointment at the Social Security office or check the status of their citizenship application.  We’re cutting waste by getting rid of federal office space that hasn’t been used in years.  We’re closing the IT gap in the federal government, and have created mobile apps that provide nutrition information for your favorite foods or wait times at the airport.  And the examples go on and on.

https://i1.wp.com/1.1.1.3/bmi/cache.daylife.com/imageserve/0dFufm2g5ub4M/610x.jpg

Photo :  Jacob J. ‘Jack’ Lew (L) looks on as U.S. President Barack Obama (R) announces that he has selected Lew to serve as Director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) in the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House July 13, 2010 in Washington, D.C. Lew, who previously served under President Clinton, will replace Peter R. Orszag who is leaving the position at the end of the month. (Getty)

Now, inertia is a powerful thing.  Constituencies grow around every agency and department with a vested interest in doing things the same way.  And that’s why we have to keep on challenging every aspect of government to rethink its core mission — to make sure we’re pursuing that mission as effectively and efficiently as possible, and to ask if that mission is better achieved by partnering with the civic, faith, and private sector communities.

This is a mission that requires some special leadership.  And Jack Lew is somebody who has proven himself already equal to this extraordinary task.

You know, if there was a fall — if there was a Hall of Fame for budget directors, then Jack Lew surely would have earned a place for his service in that role under President Clinton, when he helped balance the federal budget after years of deficits.  When Jack left that post at the end of the Clinton administration, he handed the next administration a record $236 billion budget surplus.  The day I took office, eight years later, America faced a record $1.3 trillion deficit.

Jack’s challenge over the next few years is to use his extraordinary skill and experience to cut down that deficit and put our nation back on a fiscally responsible path.  And I have the utmost faith in his ability to achieve this goal as a central member of our economic team.

Jack is the only budget director in history to preside over a budget surplus for three consecutive years.  When Jack was deputy director at OMB, he was part of the team that reached a bipartisan agreement to balance the budget for the first time in decades.  He was a principal domestic policy advisor to Tip O’Neill, and worked with him on the bipartisan agreement to reform Social Security in the 1980s.

He was executive vice president at New York University, where he oversaw budget and finances.  And for the past year and a half, he’s been successful in overseeing the State Department’s extremely complex and challenging budget as Deputy Secretary of State for Management and Resources.  I was actually worried that Hillary would not let him go.  I had to trade a number of number-one draft picks — (laughter) — to get Jack back at OMB.

But I am grateful that Hillary agreed to have Jack leave, and I’m even more thrilled that Jack agreed to take on this challenge at this moment.  Jack is going to be an outstanding OMB director.  We know it because he’s been one before.  At a time when so many families are tightening their belts, he’s going to make sure that the government continues to tighten its own.  He’s going to do this while making government more efficient, more responsive to the people it serves.

And, Jack, I am looking forward to working with you on your critical mission.  Thank you so much.  And thanks to Jack’s family, who has been putting up with him in multiple, very difficult jobs over and over again.  We appreciate his service to our country and we appreciate yours as well.  (*)

Merkel heads to Russia for talks with Medvedev

https://i0.wp.com/graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/08/25/world/25memo.600.jpg

July 13, 2010

(KATAKAMI / EXPATICA)  German Chancellor Angela Merkel will hold trade talks with Russian President Dmitry Medvedev in the Russian city of Yekaterinburg Wednesday, the Kremlin said.

The two leaders are to be joined by ministers from their respective governments for the two-day meeting, which will focus on economic cooperation, said the statement Tuesday.

Among the business tie-ups to be discussed, the two sides are to discuss a partnership between the Russia’s RJD railway company and Germany’s Siemens, the Kremlin statement added.

German government sources say Siemens will sign 2.2-billion-euro (2.8-billion-dollar) order to supply RJD with 200 trains for its regional network.

Siemens chief executive Peter Loescher will be one of the 25 business leaders accompanying Merkel to Russia and on to China and Kazakhstan in what will be a four-day tour announced last week by her office.

The two countries will also discuss the controversy of Iran’s nuclear programme, the situation in Iran, the Afghanistan conflict and Russia’s relations with the European Union.

Germany may also raise the issue of human rights: Thursday will be the first anniversary of the murder of journalist and human rights activist Natalia Estemirova. Her body was found in Ingushetia hours after she was abducted from Chechnya, in the Russian Caucasus.

Germany is Russia’s main economic partner: the two countries did 60 billion dollars’ worth of trade in 2008.  (*)

PM David Cameron and NATO Secretary-General hold talks

July 13, 2010

(KATAKAMI / NUMBER10.GOV.UK)  Prime Minister David Cameron and NATO Secretary-General Anders Fogh Rasmussen have held talks about the NATO mission in Afghanistan.

In a meeting at Number 10 on Monday, the two leaders agreed that the next year will be a crucial time and that the training of the Afghan army and police was a key objective.

Mr Cameron, who paid his first visit to Afghanistan as Prime Minister last month, reiterated that it was his Government’s top foreign policy priority.

A Downing Street spokesman said:

“They agreed on the central importance of the ongoing ISAF (International Security Assistance Force) mission in Afghanistan to the national security of the UK and all NATO allies. The Prime Minister made clear that success in Afghanistan was his Government’s highest foreign policy and national security priority.

“The leaders agreed that the next year would be crucial. The current counter-insurgency strategy remained right. The recent troop surge provided the necessary military resources. The Prime Minister made clear his confidence in General Petraeus’ ability to deliver progress on the ground. The Prime Minister and the Secretary-General reaffirmed their view that accelerating training of the Afghan National Army and Afghan National Police was a key objective for the period ahead.

“The Prime Minister thanked the Secretary-General for his vital efforts in ensuring a continued, concerted international effort in Afghanistan. The Secretary-General expressed his deep gratitude for the sacrifices made by British troops in Helmand Province.”

Mr Cameron and Mr Rasmussen also discussed work on the new NATO strategic concept and the upcoming NATO Summit in Lisbon.  (*)

Nicolas Sarkozy accused of colonial nostalgia over Bastille Day parade

https://i1.wp.com/cache.daylife.com/imageserve/0doQdFn94F3o6/x610.jpg

July 13, 2010

(KATAKAMI / GUARDIAN.CO.UK)  Half a century ago, from the desert plains of Mauritania to the forests of Madagascar, a wave of independence movements swept across French-speaking Africa and saw the birth of new nations that hoped to free themselves forever from the yoke of colonialism.

Tomorrow, as the centrepiece of Bastille Day celebrations dreamed up by Paris to mark the 50th anniversary of its farewell to empire, troops from 13 of those countries will march down the Champs Elysées alongside their French military counterparts.

But instead of the dignified occasion the government had envisaged, the ceremony has been attacked as cynical and tactless by some observers who see it as an unseemly display of France’s continuing interference in Africa.

Nicolas Sarkozy was forced to defend himself against accusations that, by emphasising France’s role in the events of 1960, he was indulging in an unpalatable form of “colonial nostalgia”.

“This is a complete misinterpretation,” said the president, stressing the “injustices and errors” of the colonial era at a lunch for the heads of state of 12 former colonies. “The aim of this meeting is therefore not to celebrate your independence – you can do that very well yourself,” he added. “It is to celebrate the strength of the links which history has woven between our peoples. And the strength of this meeting is to build together our future.”

In keeping with this spirit of contrition, Sarkozy announced that France would raise the pensions of African veterans who fought under the tricolore in the 20th century to the same level as those of French nationals. The move, which will benefit thousands of former soldiers living overseas, had been expected since May, when the constitutional council ruled that the disparities between veterans of different nationalities living in the same country were unjust.

Champ de Mars, Paris, Bastille Day

Bastille Day in Paris has taken on unwelcome colonialist overtones this year. Photograph: Benoit Tessier / Reuters/REUTERS

But, while Sarkozy might be hoping the gesture will dispel concerns about Wednesday’s unprecedented procession, he would be wrong. Objections have been made repeatedly in Africa and France.

“The 50 years of independence is our anniversary, not France’s,” Ivory Coast’s ambassador to Paris, Pierre Kipré, told the magazine Jeune Afrique, in an explanation of why his president, Laurent Gbagbo, had refused to attend the Bastille Day events. “It is not up to it to organise it for us; it is tactless of it to do so.”

While Gbagbo’s snub was largely due to a mutual frostiness between the two countries over his postponement of elections, the comments nonetheless reflect the resentment of those in Africa who feel France should keep its distance.

French critics, meanwhile, have focused their objections on what they say is the return to the bad old days of Paris’s meddling in the continent for its own cynical reasons.When he came to power, Sarkozy promised a break with the past policies of “Francafrique”, vowing a healthier relationship between the colonial-era master and its former subjects. Three years on, however, many critics say little has changed.

Last week Jean-Christophe Rufin, France’s recently departed ambassador to Senegal, unleashed an unusually outspoken attack on this failure. “I came in with a simple contract. We were told … there is going to be a complete change in our African policy. Francafrique was over,” he told French radio. “Clearly … you can see that it hasn’t happened.”

The heads of state of 12 countries – Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Congo, Gabon, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Central African Republic, Senegal, Chad and Togo – were welcomed today (TUES) at the Elysée Palace. Ivory Coast’s defence minister attended in place of Gbagbo, while the disputed leader of Madagascar, Andry Rajoelina, was not invited. Malagasy troops will, however, join the parade in Paris.

Elysée lunch for heads of former French colonies draws criticism

https://i2.wp.com/1.1.1.3/bmi/www.france24.com/en/files/imagecache/aef_ct_article_image/article/image/africa-dej-m.jpg

July 13, 2010

(KATAKAMI / FRANCE24)  The invitation of 12 leaders of former French colonies in Africa to a lunch at the Elysée Palace on the eve of the July 14 celebrations has led to accusations that France has failed to move on from its post-colonial relationship with the continent.

The attendance of a dozen leaders of France’s former African colonies* at the Elysée Palace for lunch with French President Nicolas Sarkozy on the eve of the 14 July celebrations has disappointed progressives hoping for a change in France’s relationship with Africa.

On July 14 itself, soldiers from these countries will march down the Champs Elysees in Paris for the traditional “Bastille Day” parade.

The involvement of former colonies in France’s national day marks 50 years since they gained independence; Sarkozy insists that their participation has nothing to do with “colonial nostalgia”.

Sarkozy has also announced that all former colonial combatants (about 30,000) who served France in past conflicts will receive pensions in line with their French counterparts, no matter where they live.

Exclusive relationship

However, the invitation is controversial and has been criticised as a return to a post-colonial relationship between France and its old African colonies – “La Françafrique” – that progressives hoped to have seen the back of.

The exclusivity of the “Françafrique” approach, they argue, does little or nothing to encourage the development of democracy in these countries.

French association “Survie” (Survival), which lobbies for the redrawing of the French-African relationship, said it was shocked by the lunch invitation, which spokesman Olivier Thimonier said harked back to the bad old days.

“Nothing has changed,” he said. “France is still just looking after its own interests without trying to encourage real democracy in these countries.”

“Survie” is not the only voice of dissent. François Hollande, former leader of the opposition Socialist Party, said: “We’re back in the politics of networks, of displays of collusion.”

Pointing out that France’s Minister for Cooperation [effectively for Africa] Alain Joyandet was recently sacked and not replaced, he added: “What’s worse is that France’s African policy is now completely in the hands of the Elysée Palace and the president’s immediate entourage.”

Photostream : French First lady Carla Bruni-Sarkozy meets 10 African countries first ladies

https://i1.wp.com/1.1.1.3/bmi/cache.daylife.com/imageserve/03ljcGw7B362X/x610.jpg

French First Lady Carla Bruni-Sarkozy waits for guests on the steps at the Elysee Palace in Paris after a meeting, July 13, 2010. (Getty)

https://i2.wp.com/1.1.1.3/bmi/cache.daylife.com/imageserve/0bhwcUE6S1gGC/610x.jpg

Left to Right: Central African Republic First Lady Monique Bozize, Congolese First lady Antoinette Sassou-Nguesso, Benin First Lady Chantal de Souza Yayi, Burkina Fasso First Lady Chantal Campaore, Gabon First Lady Sylvia Bongo Ondimba, French First Lady Carla Bruni-Sarkozy, Mauritania First Lady Tekber Mint Melainine Ould Ahmed, Cameroon First Lady Chantal Biya, Senegal First Lady Viviane Wade, Mali First Lady Lobbo Treaore Toure, Niger First Lady Fati Alzouima Djibo Salou and Michel Kazatchkine, Executive Director of the Global Fund to fight AIDS pose on the steps at the Elysee Palace in Paris after a meeting, July 13, 2010. (Getty)

https://i2.wp.com/1.1.1.1/bmi/cache.daylife.com/imageserve/00kmgnia3d5uz/610x.jpg

French First lady Carla Bruni-Sarkozy (C) and 10 African countries first ladies pose in front of the Elysee palace in Paris following a meeting on july 13, 2010, as leaders of 12 African countries are in France to take part in its national celebrations. Foreground: Central African Republic Monique Bozize (L), Congolese Antoinette Sassou-Nguesso (2dL), Burkina Faso’s Chantal Compaore (3dL), Benin’s Chantal de Souza Yayi (4thL), Cameroon’s Chantal Biya (3dR), Mali’s Lobbo Traore Toure (2ndR) and Niger’s Fati Alzouma Djobo Salou (R). Background : Gabon’ Sylvia Valentin (L), Mauritania’s Tekber Mint Melainine Ould Ahmed (C) and Senegal’s Viviane Wade (2ndR). (Getty)

https://i2.wp.com/1.1.1.5/bmi/cache.daylife.com/imageserve/0aHI4ce3PebZS/x610.jpg

French First Lady Carla Bruni-Sarkozy, right, shakes hands with First Lady of Congo Antoinette Sassou Nguesso, as First Ladies of Central African Republic Monique Bozize, left background, Sylvia Bongo Ondimba of Gabon, background, and Chantal de Souza Yayi of Benin, center, look on as they leave the Elysee Palace, in Paris, Tuesday July 13, 2010. (Getty)

https://i1.wp.com/1.1.1.2/bmi/cache.daylife.com/imageserve/07d42jEaGgfut/x610.jpg

French First lady Carla Bruni-Sarkozy (C) speaks with Benin’s first lady Chantal Boni (2dL) before posing with 10 African countries’ first ladies in front of the Elysee palace in Paris following a meeting on July 13, 2010, as leaders of 12 African countries are in France to take part in its national celebrations. (Getty)

https://i1.wp.com/cache.daylife.com/imageserve/0br65gbgqy9JD/x610.jpg

French First lady Carla Bruni-Sarkozy (C) speaks with Cameroon’s counterpart Chantal Biya (C) next to Mali’s Lobbo Traore Toure while posing with 10 African countries’ first ladies in front of the Elysee palace inParis following a meeting on July 13, 2010, as leaders of 12 African countries are in France to take part in its national celebrations. (Getty)

https://i2.wp.com/cache.daylife.com/imageserve/0aXqbqS4601Xi/610x.jpg

France’s First Lady Carla Bruni-Sarkozy (R) welcomes Central African Republic First Lady Monique Bozize as she arrives at the Elysee Palace in Paris, July 13, 2010. (Getty)

https://i0.wp.com/cache.daylife.com/imageserve/0aOB81kgH23ag/x610.jpg

France’s First Lady Carla Bruni-Sarkozy (L) welcomes Mali First Lady Lobbo Treaore Toure as she arrives at the Elysee Palace in Paris, July 13, 2010. (Getty)

https://i0.wp.com/cache.daylife.com/imageserve/030a6jt64nf7x/x610.jpg

France’s First Lady Carla Bruni-Sarkozy (L) welcomes Congolese First lady Antoinette Sassou-Nguesso as she arrives at the Elysee Palace in Paris, July 13, 2010. (Getty)

https://i0.wp.com/cache.daylife.com/imageserve/050Z1XL8iD15Y/610x.jpg

France’s First Lady Carla Bruni-Sarkozy (R) welcomes Benin First Lady Chantal de Souza Yayi as she arrives at the Elysee Palace in Paris, July 13, 2010. (Getty)

https://i0.wp.com/cache.daylife.com/imageserve/0fnl0Vbd6vgbh/x610.jpg

France’s First Lady Carla Bruni-Sarkozy (R) welcomes Central African Republic First Lady Monique Bozize as she arrives at the Elysee Palace in Paris, July 13, 2010. (Getty)

https://i2.wp.com/cache.daylife.com/imageserve/02Og8YW4aw7Qe/x610.jpgFrench First Lady Carla Bruni-Sarkozy (L) welcomes Cameroun’s First Lady Chantal Biya (R) on July 13, 2010 at the Elysee Palace in Paris. (Getty)

https://i1.wp.com/1.1.1.4/bmi/cache.daylife.com/imageserve/06qSba880385X/610x.jpg

French first lady Carla Bruni-Sarkozy, left, smiles as she welcomes first lady of Cameroon Chantal Biya, right, at the Elysee Palace, in Paris, Tuesday July 13, 2010. (Getty)

https://i1.wp.com/1.1.1.5/bmi/cache.daylife.com/imageserve/0cOs5ZN5Fsa5F/x610.jpg

French first lady Carla Bruni-Sarkozy, right, welcomes first lady of Gabon Sylvia Bongo Ondimba, left, at the Elysee Palace, in Paris, Tuesday July 13, 2010. (Getty)

https://i1.wp.com/cache.daylife.com/imageserve/02hn36VeVi8j2/610x.jpg

French First Lady Carla Bruni-Sarkozy (L) welcomes Mauritania’s First Lady Tekber Mint Melainine Ould Ahmed (2ndR) on July 13, 2010 at the Elysee Palace in Paris. (Getty)

https://i2.wp.com/cache.daylife.com/imageserve/03We2YucPp3jL/x610.jpg

France’s First Lady Carla Bruni-Sarkozy (L) welcomes Niger First Lady Fati Alzouima Djibo Salou as she arrives at the Elysee Palace in Paris, July 13, 2010. (Getty)

Medvedev, Merkel to address bilateral trade, international issues

https://i0.wp.com/1.1.1.5/bmi/en.rian.ru/images/15980/09/159800970.jpg

July 13, 2010

(KATAKAMI / RIA NOVOSTI)  Russian President Dmitry Medvedev and German Chancellor Angela Merkel will discuss bilateral trade, economic, cultural and humanitarian ties, as well as international affairs, a Russian presidential aide said on Tuesday.

Medvedev and Merkel will meet on July 14-15 in Yekaterinburg as part of Russian-German interstate consultations.

“Our priorities include European security, Russia-EU and Russia-NATO cooperation, and the implementation of G-8 and G-20 decisions,” Sergei Prikhodko said.

On Thursday, Medvedev and Merkel are to meet with representatives of Russian and German business circles.

Prikhodko said as a result of the interstate consultations, Russia and Germany will sign more than 10 documents, including a memorandum on a managerial personnel training program, a statement of intent on cooperation in physical education and sport, an agreement on cooperation between the countries’ public health ministries, and a memorandum of understanding between the Skolkovo foundation and Siemens AG.

Russia’s Rostekhnologii and RusHydro and Germany’s Siemens AG will also sign a partnership agreement on the establishment of a joint venture to manufacture power units.