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Daily Archives: 06/18/2010

Photostream : French President Nicolas Sarkozy meets British Prime Minister David Cameron

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LONDON, ENGLAND – JUNE 18: French President Nicolas Sarkozy and his wife Carla Bruni-Sarkozy are kissed goodbye by Prime Minister David Cameron and his wife Samantha on the steps of Downing Street on June 18, 2010 in London, England. President Sarkozy and his wife are visiting London for the day to commemorate President de Gaulle’s famous wartime broadcast to Nazi occupied France. De Gaulle fled France on June 17, 1940 and in his broadcast the next day he declared himself leader of the ‘Free French’, leading to the formation of the French Resistance movement which went on to play a vital role in defeating the Germans.

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British Prime Minister David Cameron (2nd L), and his wife Samantha (R) greet French President Nicolas Sarkozy (2nd R) and his wife Carla Bruni-Sarkozy on the steps of 10 Downing Street in central London on June 18, 2010. Sarkozy and World War II veterans visited London Friday to mark the 70th anniversary of Charles de Gaulle’s rousing radio appeal to his compatriots to resist the Nazi occupation. On June 18, 1940, four days after the fall of Paris and as the French government prepared to sign an armistice with Germany, the exiled military leader issued an impassioned appeal over the BBC airwaves to those back home.

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LONDON, ENGLAND – JUNE 18: French President Nicolas Sarkozy (2R) and his wife Carla Bruni-Sarkozy (L) sit with Prime Minister David Cameron (2L) and his wife Samantha Cameron (R) inside Number 10 Downing Street on June 18, 2010 in London, England. President Sarkozy and his wife are visiting London for the day to commemorate President de Gaulle’s famous wartime broadcast to Nazi occupied France. De Gaulle fled France on June 17, 1940 and in his broadcast the next day he declared himself leader of the ‘Free French’, leading to the formation of the French Resistance movement which went on to play a vital role in defeating the Germans.

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French First Lady, Carla Bruni-Sarkozy (L), and her husband, French President Nicolas Sarkozy (2nd L), share a light moment with British Prime Minister David Cameron (R) and his wife Samantha during a parade at The Royal Hospital Chelsea, in London June 18, 2010. Sarkozy and World War II veterans visited London Friday to mark the 70th anniversary of Charles de Gaulle’s rousing radio appeal to his compatriots to resist the Nazi occupation. On June 18, 1940, four days after the fall of Paris and as the French government prepared to sign an armistice with Germany, the exiled military leader issued an impassioned appeal over the BBC airwaves to those back home.

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Britain’s Prime Minister David Cameron (L) embraces French President Nicolas Sarkozy in between speeches at The Royal Hospital Chelsea in London June 18, 2010. Sarkozy and World War II veterans visited London Friday to mark the 70th anniversary of Charles de Gaulle’s rousing radio appeal to his compatriots to resist the Nazi occupation. On June 18, 1940, four days after the fall of Paris and as the French government prepared to sign an armistice with Germany, the exiled military leader issued an impassioned appeal over the BBC airwaves to those back home.

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LONDON, ENGLAND – JUNE 18: British Prime Minister David Cameron (L) and French President Nicolas Sarkozy listen to the national anthems during a parade at The Royal Hospital Cheslea on June 18, 2010, in London, England. Sarkozy and his wife are visiting London for the day to commemorate President de Gaulle’s famous wartime broadcast to Nazi occupied France. De Gaulle fled France on June 17, 1940 and in his broadcast the next day he declared himself leader of the ‘Free French’, leading to the formation of the French Resistance Movement which went on to play a vital role in defeating the Germans.

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Britain’s Prime Minister David Cameron (C) embraces French President Nicolas Sarkozy in between speeches at The Royal Hospital Chelsea in London June 18, 2010. Sarkozy and World War II veterans visited London Friday to mark the 70th anniversary of Charles de Gaulle’s rousing radio appeal to his compatriots to resist the Nazi occupation. On June 18, 1940, four days after the fall of Paris and as the French government prepared to sign an armistice with Germany, the exiled military leader issued an impassioned appeal over the BBC airwaves to those back home.

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LONDON, ENGLAND – JUNE 18: (L-R) Lady Soames, daughter of Britain’s former Prime Minister Winston Churchill, France’s President Nicolas Sarkozy, Britan’s Prime Minister David Cameron, Sarkozy’s wife Carla Bruni-Sarkozy and David Cameron’s wife Samantha Cameron attend a ceremony during his visit to the Royal Hospital Chelsea on June 18, 2010, in London, England. Sarkozy and his wife are visiting London for the day to commemorate President de Gaulle’s famous wartime broadcast to Nazi occupied France. De Gaulle fled France on June 17, 1940 and in his broadcast the next day he declared himself leader of the ‘Free French’, leading to the formation of the French Resistance Movement which went on to play a vital role in defeating the Germans.

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LONDON, ENGLAND – JUNE 18: France’s President Nicolas Sarkozy, (2R), and Britain’s Prime Minister David Cameron, (R) meet attendees of a ceremony during their visit to the Royal Hospital Chelsea on June 18, 2010 in London, England. Sarkozy and his wife are visiting London for the day to commemorate President de Gaulle’s famous wartime broadcast to Nazi occupied France. De Gaulle fled France on June 17, 1940 and in his broadcast the next day he declared himself leader of the ‘Free French’, leading to the formation of the French Resistance Movement which went on to play a vital role in defeating the Germans.

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LONDON – JUNE 18: (L-R) British Prime Minister David Cameron and French President Nicolas Sarkozy talk with Legion de Honeur recipients and World War II veterans Walter Freegard, Glynne Medlicott, and Alex Sutton during a parade at the Royal Chelsea Hospital on June 18, 2010 in London, England. French President Nicolas Sarkozy and his wife Carla Bruni-Sarkozy are visiting London for the day to commemorate President Charles de Gaulle’s famous wartime broadcast to Nazi-occupied France. De Gaulle fled France on June 17, 1940 and in his broadcast the next day he declared himself leader of the ‘Free French’, leading to the formation of the French Resistance Movement, which went on to play a vital role in defeating the Germans.

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LONDON – JUNE 18: Samantha Cameron, wife of British Prime Minister David Cameron (L) greets Carla Bruni-Sarkozy, wife of President Nicolas Sarkozy at the Royal Chelsea Hospital on June 18, June 2010 in London, England. French President Sarkozy and his wife Carla Bruni-Sarkozy are visiting London for the day to commemorate President de Gaulle’s famous wartime broadcast to Nazi occupied France. De Gaulle fled France on June 17, 1940 and in his broadcast the next day he declared himself leader of the ‘Free French’, leading to the formation of the French Resistance Movement which went on to play a vital role in defeating the Germans.

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LONDON – JUNE 18: Samantha Cameron (L), wife of British Prime Minister David Cameron, greets Carla Bruni-Sarkozy, wife of President Nicolas Sarkozy at the Royal Chelsea Hospital on June 18, 2010 in London, England. French President Sarkozy and his wife Carla Bruni-Sarkozy are visiting London for the day to commemorate President Charles de Gaulle’s famous wartime broadcast to Nazi-occupied France. De Gaulle fled France on June 17, 1940 and in his broadcast the next day he declared himself leader of the ‘Free French’, leading to the formation of the French Resistance Movement, which went on to play a vital role in defeating the Germans.

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Photostream : French President Nicolas Sarkoz meets Prince of Wales

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LONDON, ENGLAND – JUNE 18: President of the French Republic, Nicolas Sarkozy and HRH Prince Charles, Prince of Wales lay wreaths at the statue of Charles De Gaulle on June 18, 2010 in London, England. Sarkozy and his wife are visiting London for the day to commemorate pesident de Gaulle’s famous wartime broadcast to Nazi occupied France. De Gaulle fled France on June 17, 1940 and in his broadcast the next day he declared himself leader of the ‘Free French’, leading to the formation of the French Resistance Movement which went on to play a vital role in defeating the Germans.

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Britain’s Prince Charles, center, greets the French President Nicolas Sarkozy, and his wife Carla Bruni-Sarkozy at Clarence House in London Friday, June, 18, 2010. Clarence House is the London home of Prince Charles.

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Britain’s Prince Charles, second right, greets the French President Nicolas Sarkozy, second left, and his wife Carla Bruni-Sarkozy at Clarence House in London Friday, June, 18, 2010. Clarence House is the London home of Prince Charles.

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LONDON, ENGLAND – JUNE 18: French President Nicolas Sarkozy (L) and his wife Carla Bruni-Sarkozy (C) walk to a statue of General Charles De Gaulle with HRH Prince Charles (R) after laying a wreath at the statues of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth on June 18, 2010 in London, England. President Sarkozy and his wife are visiting London for the day to commemorate President de Gaulle’s famous wartime broadcast to Nazi occupied France. De Gaulle fled France on June 17, 1940 and in his broadcast the next day he declared himself leader of the ‘Free French’, leading to the formation of the French Resistance movement which went on to play a vital role in defeating the Germans.

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LONDON, ENGLAND – JUNE 18: Carla Bruni-Sarkozy (2R) and her husband, French President Nicolas Sarkozy and Prince Charles, Prince of Wales look at photographs of French President Charles De Gaulle during a visit to the former headquarters of the ‘Free French’, at Carlton Gardens on June 18, 2010 in London, England. Sarkozy and his wife are visiting London for the day to commemorate President de Gaulle’s famous wartime broadcast to Nazi occupied France. De Gaulle fled France on June 17, 1940 and in his broadcast the next day he declared himself leader of the ‘Free French’, leading to the formation of the French Resistance Movement which went on to play a vital role in defeating the Germans.

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French President Nicolas Sarkozy (L), his wife Carla Bruni-Sarkozy (2nd R) and Britain’s Prince Charles (R) look at photographs of French President Charles De Gaulle during a visit to the former headquarters of the Free French, at Carlton Gardens in central London on June 18, 2010. Sarkozy and World War II veterans visited London Friday to mark the 70th anniversary of Charles de Gaulle’s rousing radio appeal to his compatriots to resist the Nazi occupation. On June 18, 1940, four days after the fall of Paris and as the French government prepared to sign an armistice with Germany, the exiled military leader issued an impassioned appeal over the BBC airwaves to those back home.

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French President Nicolas Sarkozy, left, his wife Carla Bruni-Sarkozy, second right, and Britain’s Prince Charles, right, look at photographs of French President Charles De Gaulle during a visit to London headquarters of the Free French, the fighters led by de Gaulle, who rejected their country’s surrender to Nazi Germany, on Friday June 18, 2010. Sarkozy marked the 70th anniversary of Charles de Gaulle’s defiant World War II broadcast from London on Friday, visiting the studio where the leader urged his compatriots to resist the German occupation.

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LONDON, ENGLAND – JUNE 18: French President Nicolas Sarkozy (Centre Left) and HRH Prince Charles (Centre Right) prepare to lay a wreath at the statues of HM King George VI and HM Queen Elizabeth on June 18, 2010 in London, England. President Sarkozy and his wife are visiting London for the day to commemorate President de Gaulle’s famous wartime broadcast to Nazi occupied France. De Gaulle fled France on June 17, 1940 and in his broadcast the next day he declared himself leader of the ‘Free French’, leading to the formation of the French Resistance movement which went on to play a vital role in defeating the Germans.

Russia's Medvedev raps EU, US sanctions against Iran

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(BBC)  Russian President Dmitry Medvedev has criticised the unilateral US and EU sanctions on Iran that go beyond those approved by the UN Security Council.

He said Russia “did not agree” to any separate sanctions when it backed a joint UN resolution last week.

Meanwhile, Pentagon chief Robert Gates said US intelligence showed that Iran could be able to attack Europe with “scores” of missiles by 2020.

He added that Russia seemed to have a “schizophrenic” approach to Iran.

Moscow viewed Iran as a threat, but still pursued commercial ties with it, he told a US senate hearing in Washington.

Western powers suspect Iran is seeking nuclear weapons – which Tehran denies.

‘Collective action’

In an interview that ran on Thursday, the Russian leader criticised the EU and US for acting unilaterally.

“We didn’t agree to this when we discussed the joint resolution at the UN,” Mr Medvedev told the Wall Street Journal.

Russia this month agreed to back a fourth round of UN sanctions against Tehran, following months of US-led diplomacy.

“A couple of years ago, that would have been impossible,” Mr Medvedev said. “We should act collectively. If we do, we will have the desired result.”

The fresh EU sanctions approved in Brussels on Thursday include a ban on investments and technology transfers to Iran’s key oil and gas industry – measures that go further than the latest UN sanctions.

Only a day earlier, the US announced sanctions that ban Americans from trading with a number of firms and individuals, including Iran’s Post Bank, its defence minister and the air force and missile command of the Revolutionary Guard Corps.

‘Salvo attack’

Separately, at a senate hearing in Washington, US Defence Secretary Robert Gates said US intelligence had shown that Iran could launch an attack against Europe with “scores or hundreds” of missiles by 2020.

He said the intelligence had prompted major changes to US missile defences plans, called a “phased adaptive approach”.

The new approach uses sea- and land-based interceptors to protect Nato allies in Europe, instead of larger weapons designed to counter long-range missiles.

One of the elements that contributed to the phased approach “was the realisation that if Iran were actually to launch a missile attack on Europe, it wouldn’t be just one or two missiles or a handful,” Gates told the hearing.

“It would more likely be a salvo kind of attack, where you would be dealing potentially with scores or even hundreds of missiles.”

During the hearing, Mr Gates acknowledged one lawmaker’s concerns about Russia’s long-standing commercial links to Tehran, which he noted go back more than 20 years.

“You’ve just put your finger on a kind of schizophrenic Russian approach to this,” Mr Gates told the Senate Armed Services Committee.

“I think that it is this balancing act. And Russia, they recognize the security threat that Iran presents,” he said.

On 10 June the Security Council endorsed a fourth round of UN sanctions on Iran, including tighter financial curbs and an expanded arms embargo.

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad dismissed the vote and rejected calls to halt uranium enrichment – which could have military as well as civilian uses.

Iran insists its nuclear programme is solely designed to produce energy.

Photostream : Argentina head coach Diego Maradona

 

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A picture combo shows Argentina’s coach Diego Maradona crossing himself before the start of the 2010 World Cup group B first round football match between Argentina and South Korea on June 17, 2010 at Soccer City stadium in Soweto, suburban Johannesburg.

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Argentina’s coach Diego Maradona celebrates after his team beat South Korea in their 2010 World Cup group B first round football match on June 17, 2010 at Soccer City stadium in Soweto, suburban Johannesburg.

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Argentina’s coach Diego Maradona shouts instructions at players during the 2010 World Cup group B first round football match between Argentina and South Korea on June 17, 2010 at Soccer City stadium in Soweto, suburban Johannesburg.

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Argentina’s coach Diego Maradona celebrates after his team beat South Korea in their 2010 World Cup group B first round football match on June 17, 2010 at Soccer City stadium in Soweto, suburban Johannesburg.

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Argentina’s coach Diego Maradona eyes a ball during the 2010 World Cup group B first round football match between Argentina and South Korea on June 17, 2010 at Soccer City stadium in Soweto, suburban Johannesburg.

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Argentina’s coach Diego Maradona celebrates with staff member during the Group B first round 2010 World Cup football match Argentina versus South Korea on June 17, 2010 at Soccer City stadium in Soweto, suburban Johannesburg. Argentina won the match 4-1.

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Argentina head coach Diego Maradona, right, and Argentina’s Lionel Messi, left walk off the pitch after Argentina won the World Cup group B soccer match between Argentina and South Korea at Soccer City in Johannesburg, South Africa, Thursday, June 17, 2010. Argentina won 4-1.

EU approves new sanctions on Iran

Mahmoud Ahmadinejad

 

 

AP

 

June 17, 2010

BRUSSELS – European Union leaders on Thursday adopted a new set of sanctions against Iran in a further effort to stall its disputed nuclear program.

The restrictions, which come on top of sanctions already imposed by the U.N. Security Council, were approved during a summit focused primarily on economic issues, spokeswoman Maja Kocijancic said.

A statement said the sanctions target dual-use items that could be used as part of a nuclear program, and Iran’s oil and gas industry — including the “prohibition of new investment, technical assistance and transfers of technologies.”

Iran’s shipping and air cargo companies will be banned from operating in EU territory, and new visa bans and asset freezes will be imposed on Iran’s Revolutionary Guard. The sanctions also encompass trade insurance and financial transactions.

The measures are meant to strengthen other embargoes imposed by the EU in response to past U.N. Security Council resolutions. Last week, the council adopted its own sanctions after Iran rebuffed a plan to suspend uranium enrichment and swap its stockpiles of low-enriched uranium for fuel rods.

They are also in line with similar measures adopted by the Obama administration, which imposed penalties Wednesday against additional individuals and institutions it says are helping Iran develop its nuclear and missile programs and evade international sanctions.

British Prime Minister David Cameron said Thursday that Europe needed to play a full role in the international effort to deal with Iran’s nuclear program.

This means “making sure that we have a strong package of sanctions against Iran,” he said. “We believe it is incredibly important.”

The new EU sanctions will now be passed on to government technical experts to work out the specifics of which companies and products would be targeted, and how. This could be a tricky procedure, given the different economic interests of EU countries involved.

Officials predicted the procedure would last a month before the final list is endorsed by EU foreign ministers at their next meeting at the end of July.

The U.N. is seeking to disrupt the money flow to Iran’s Revolutionary Guard. Its new sanctions call for an asset freeze on 40 additional companies and organizations involved in nuclear or ballistic missile activities.

The United States, Israel and the EU fear that Iran will continue to upgrade its uranium enrichment program until it can produce a nuclear weapon. Iran says it seeks to develop fuel only for its energy and research reactors, and that it has the right to enrich uranium under the international nonproliferation treaty.

Iran has dismissed the impact of sanctions, vowing to expand its atomic research program.

On Thursday, the country’s defense minister said the new sanctions would not affect Iran’s armed forces because the country is militarily self-sufficient.

“We are not seeking arms. We have the capability to export,” Gen. Ahmad Vahidi was quoted as saying on the website of Iran’s state TV.

Iran has been pursuing self-sufficiency in military production since 1992.

The union’s foreign policy chief, Catherine Ashton, has said the door remains open for negotiations with Iran.

She has on Monday she had invited the country’s top nuclear negotiator, Saeed Jalili, to discuss the issue. EU officials said Iran was expected to accept the invitation and that talks could resume later this summer. Ashton said Thursday she was still awaiting a reply.